FAQ’s

Below are a selection of frequently asked questions:

How often do I need to come in?

You need to come in and have your extendible implant lengthened when you have a small amount of shortening, typically this would be about 5mm. There are times when you are growing that you will grow more rapidly and you will need to come in a little bit more frequently. Boys tend to grow more rapidly between the ages of 12 and 14 and girls a little younger. If you’ve had chemotherapy this may slow your growth and when you’ve finished your body may grow a little rapidly to compensate. Typically you will be lengthened 2 to 3 times each year. It’s not critical if you are a little short and unable to come in immediately.

Will it hurt?

Over the years, many patients have been lengthened non-invasively with this type of mechanism. These people have reported that they have no pain and that they sometimes feel the tissues tightening. Some have reported that their joint feels stiff for a few days afterwards but with some exercise the stiffness goes away. The mechanism is designed to grow slowly (4 minutes to lengthen 1mm) in order to stretch the tissues. The lengthening procedure can be stopped and if required the mechanism can be made to go in reverse if you feel the tissues have been stretched too far and you are unable to move your joint. The vast majority of patients who have come in are lengthened problem free.

Who will lengthen it?

Lengthening procedures take place in the hospital, normally within the outpatient department. In many of the hospitals which specialize in this kind of treatment, they have staff who are very familiar with the lengthening procedure. Your doctor or one of his assistants may lengthen your implant. Otherwise, it could be your physiotherapist, a specialist nurse or a physician’s assistant. All of the staff are trained in the use of the equipment.

What is it made of?

Your implant has been made for you. The implant is predominantly made from Titanium alloy and this is a metal that has been used for orthopaedic implants for a long time. It is very strong, very light and is biocompatible meaning that it is not toxic to your body. In the knee or hip joints, a different metal is used an this is a very hard wearing metal called Cobalt Chrome Molybdenum alloy. The implants are made from metal because it needs to be very strong and last for a very long time. Inside your implant is a small gearbox and onto this is attached a magnet.

Will it break?

Your implant is made from a very strong metal called Titanium that is used to build aircraft. It is very strong but if you have a fall you may break the implant like you may break your bones. This is very rare but it can occur. A broken implant can be replaced.

What sports can I do?

Sports keeps you fit and it is good to undertake sports, but part of your leg is replaced with a piece of metal and you can damage the fixation of the implant in the bone if you undertake strenuous contact sports such as rugby or football. Sports that are good include swimming and cycling. Talk to your surgeon about the sports that you wish to undertake. Leading a healthy lifestyle does help to build your bones and keeps your joints mobile.

What happens when I stop growing?

When you stop growing your leg will be lengthened to match the length of your other leg. The implant will not be taken out and replaced with an ‘adult’ implant. Your implant is very strong, and if well fixed in the bone, will not be replaced potentially for many years. Unless there is a problem, there is no need to replace an extendible implant.

Can it be exchanged?

The implant sometimes needs to be exchanged for a number of reasons as follows: You may have not stopped growing but the maximum amount of the extension of the implant may have been reached. Your surgeon, in discussion with the design team, will decide if a part or the whole of the implant needs to be exchanged for a longer extending implant. If the implant has loosened in the bone or it may have broken again the implant can be exchanged for a new one. If you have not stopped growing this will be another extendible implant and if you have it will be an adult implant. Unfortunately some implants become infected and your surgeon will need to remove the implant to be able to treat the infection. Following treatment, they may implant another growing devic.

Will I set the detectors off at the airport?

In the unlikely event that you will set the detectors off at the airport when passing through security you will need to explain to them that you have a special implant in your leg made of metal. The security staff at airports see many people with metal hips and knees and are very used to having the alarms set off by metallic implants. With you being a youngster this is much less frequent and this may be something they have not seen before. The implant detector will not damage your implant and nor will your implant damage the security detectors, but it may be wise to tell the security staff before you enter the detector.

Is it heavy?

Although your implant is made from metal, Titanium alloy is relatively light and is similar in weight to your bone that has been removed. The weight of the implant should not be noticeable.

Does it get hot when being extended?

The gearbox inside your implant when being extended does turn very fast, but the implant does not get warm.

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Copyright 2012 | Stanmore Implants Ltd | Design by Varn Media Privacy | Text Only Version

FAQ’s

Below are a selection of frequently asked questions:

How often do I need to come in?

You need to come in and have your extendible implant lengthened when you have a small amount of shortening, typically this would be about 5mm. There are times when you are growing that you will grow more rapidly and you will need to come in a little bit more frequently. Boys tend to grow more rapidly between the ages of 12 and 14 and girls a little younger. If you’ve had chemotherapy this may slow your growth and when you’ve finished your body may grow a little rapidly to compensate. Typically you will be lengthened 2 to 3 times each year. It’s not critical if you are a little short and unable to come in immediately.

Will it hurt?

Over the years, many patients have been lengthened non-invasively with this type of mechanism. These people have reported that they have no pain and that they sometimes feel the tissues tightening. Some have reported that their joint feels stiff for a few days afterwards but with some exercise the stiffness goes away. The mechanism is designed to grow slowly (4 minutes to lengthen 1mm) in order to stretch the tissues. The lengthening procedure can be stopped and if required the mechanism can be made to go in reverse if you feel the tissues have been stretched too far and you are unable to move your joint. The vast majority of patients who have come in are lengthened problem free.

Who will lengthen it?

Lengthening procedures take place in the hospital, normally within the outpatient department. In many of the hospitals which specialize in this kind of treatment, they have staff who are very familiar with the lengthening procedure. Your doctor or one of his assistants may lengthen your implant. Otherwise, it could be your physiotherapist, a specialist nurse or a physician’s assistant. All of the staff are trained in the use of the equipment.

What is it made of?

Your implant has been made for you. The implant is predominantly made from Titanium alloy and this is a metal that has been used for orthopaedic implants for a long time. It is very strong, very light and is biocompatible meaning that it is not toxic to your body. In the knee or hip joints, a different metal is used an this is a very hard wearing metal called Cobalt Chrome Molybdenum alloy. The implants are made from metal because it needs to be very strong and last for a very long time. Inside your implant is a small gearbox and onto this is attached a magnet.

Will it break?

Your implant is made from a very strong metal called Titanium that is used to build aircraft. It is very strong but if you have a fall you may break the implant like you may break your bones. This is very rare but it can occur. A broken implant can be replaced.

What sports can I do?

Sports keeps you fit and it is good to undertake sports, but part of your leg is replaced with a piece of metal and you can damage the fixation of the implant in the bone if you undertake strenuous contact sports such as rugby or football. Sports that are good include swimming and cycling. Talk to your surgeon about the sports that you wish to undertake. Leading a healthy lifestyle does help to build your bones and keeps your joints mobile.

What happens when I stop growing?

When you stop growing your leg will be lengthened to match the length of your other leg. The implant will not be taken out and replaced with an ‘adult’ implant. Your implant is very strong, and if well fixed in the bone, will not be replaced potentially for many years. Unless there is a problem, there is no need to replace an extendible implant.

Can it be exchanged?

The implant sometimes needs to be exchanged for a number of reasons as follows: You may have not stopped growing but the maximum amount of the extension of the implant may have been reached. Your surgeon, in discussion with the design team, will decide if a part or the whole of the implant needs to be exchanged for a longer extending implant. If the implant has loosened in the bone or it may have broken again the implant can be exchanged for a new one. If you have not stopped growing this will be another extendible implant and if you have it will be an adult implant. Unfortunately some implants become infected and your surgeon will need to remove the implant to be able to treat the infection. Following treatment, they may implant another growing devic.

Will I set the detectors off at the airport?

In the unlikely event that you will set the detectors off at the airport when passing through security you will need to explain to them that you have a special implant in your leg made of metal. The security staff at airports see many people with metal hips and knees and are very used to having the alarms set off by metallic implants. With you being a youngster this is much less frequent and this may be something they have not seen before. The implant detector will not damage your implant and nor will your implant damage the security detectors, but it may be wise to tell the security staff before you enter the detector.

Is it heavy?

Although your implant is made from metal, Titanium alloy is relatively light and is similar in weight to your bone that has been removed. The weight of the implant should not be noticeable.

Does it get hot when being extended?

The gearbox inside your implant when being extended does turn very fast, but the implant does not get warm.

Watch our real life stories about the JTS implant

Copyright © 2017 | Stanmore Implants Ltd | Website by Varn Text Only Version