Rotationplasty & Amputation Comparisons

Each patient has their own unique requirements with respect to their age, the location and type of tumor and their prognosis. You also have to take into consideration the requirements, desires and wishes of their family. Therefore there is no one ideal form of limb sparing surgery.

Receiving the right surgical procedure for you will depend very much on the above factors. The choices available may be wide, but occasionally they may be restricted. This can be because of the size and location of the tumor.  Your orthopaedic surgeon will be able to explain in detail the options that are available to you.

If your condition permits a number of limb sparing options, weighing up each option is a considerable undertaking.

Some points you may wish to consider:

What will you want to be able to do in the near future, in 5, 10 and 20 years time?  If you are very sporty and cannot live without participating fully in active sports then some type of reconstruction would be more suitable.  Later in life will this choice of reconstruction remain?

Some forms of limb sparing options can modified or another mode undertaken if there are complications. For example, if an implant fails they are routinely revised with another implant. If there is a major complication then an amputation may be required. If an amputation or rotationplasty has been undertaken then it would not be possible to have an implant in the future.

Your cancer care, limb sparing surgery and any aftercare requires specialist skills. Each type of limb sparing surgery has its own unique requirements. Your cancer centre may not be able to offer you all of the choices.

1. Rotationplasty vs. amputation

Rotationplasty is a form oRotationplastyf partial amputation. For youngsters with tumours of the lower end of the thigh bone (distal femur) the advantage of a rotationplasty compared with an amputation is that it is in effect a modified below knee amputation.  The limb is shortened and the lower leg is rotated 180 degrees permitting the ankle to act as a new “knee” joint.  An artificial limb known as an exo-prosthesis has a special socket that fits onto the foot.  Rotationplasty has improved function over a trans-femoral amputation allowing patients to activity participate in sports.

Appearance is one of the biggest concerns of those considering rotationplasty.  Centres who offer this form of partial amputation frequently have patient advocates who have rotationplasties and can tell you what life is like living with a rotationplasty.  Unlike mid-thigh amputations rotationplasties are much more uncommon and not all centres have the appropriate skilled staff.  For example, the prosthetists, the specialists who fit exo-prostheses may or may not have experience fitting the socket to a foot. Good fitment of the exo-prosthesis is essential.

2. Rotationplasty vs JTS

Young patients who have tumours of the lower end of the thigh bone (distal femur) who are eligible for limb sparing may be offered an extendible implant or rotationplasty. Those who are very young, rotationplasty has the advantage of being only one major surgery.  Although implants are successful the amount of extension that can be obtained may not be sufficient to achieve legs of equal length at the time that growing ceases.  A partial or complete revision of the extendible implant may be required and this will involve further surgery.  Older patients who have less growing to do and who require a larger implant, may need only one implant.  Appearance is one of the biggest concerns of those considering rotationplasty compared to implant.  Implants have the advantage of retaining the natural appearance of the the leg and for many patients it does not limit their desired activities (although it is recommended that physical contact sports are not undertaken).

With the JTS non-invasive extending technology the length of your two legs came be maintained with periodic visits.  As a result of precision engineering the reliability of the extending mechanism is very good.  In addition, as the implants are made from titanium alloy, a very durable and strong material, the implant does not need replacing once skeletal maturity has been reached. Like extendible implants, rotationplasty is not issue-free and regular visits to the limb fitting centre will be needed, particularly within the first year when a number of legs and sockets will be required.  The length of the exo-prosthesis will also need to be adjusted to maintain the same leg length as the other leg grows. The fitting of a socket onto a foot is not commonplace and will require a prosthetist with experience of moulding this unusual socket.

3. Amputation vs JTS

There are occasions when amputation is the only surgical solution often due to the location of the tumor.  If limb sparing options are available your surgeon would advocate these rather than an amputation.  Extendible implants have the advantage that they keep the normal appearance of the limb, they are very reliable and many patients are not restricted in activities they wish to undertake.  Similarly, artificial limbs are not issue-free and the sockets require regular maintenance. The length also needs to be adjusted regularly.

Other Helpful Articles About Rotationplasty

If you are interesting in finding out more about Rotationplasty and limb sparing surgery please read the articles mentioned below:

Article: What is Rotationplasty

Article: What is Limb Sparing Surgery?

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Find our more about the JTS Implant by watching our video interviews with patients, surgeons and parents.

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Rotationplasty & Amputation Comparisons

Each patient has their own unique requirements with respect to their age, the location and type of tumor and their prognosis. You also have to take into consideration the requirements, desires and wishes of their family. Therefore there is no one ideal form of limb sparing surgery.

Receiving the right surgical procedure for you will depend very much on the above factors. The choices available may be wide, but occasionally they may be restricted. This can be because of the size and location of the tumor.  Your orthopaedic surgeon will be able to explain in detail the options that are available to you.

If your condition permits a number of limb sparing options, weighing up each option is a considerable undertaking.

Some points you may wish to consider:

What will you want to be able to do in the near future, in 5, 10 and 20 years time?  If you are very sporty and cannot live without participating fully in active sports then some type of reconstruction would be more suitable.  Later in life will this choice of reconstruction remain?

Some forms of limb sparing options can modified or another mode undertaken if there are complications. For example, if an implant fails they are routinely revised with another implant. If there is a major complication then an amputation may be required. If an amputation or rotationplasty has been undertaken then it would not be possible to have an implant in the future.

Your cancer care, limb sparing surgery and any aftercare requires specialist skills. Each type of limb sparing surgery has its own unique requirements. Your cancer centre may not be able to offer you all of the choices.

1. Rotationplasty vs. amputation

Rotationplasty is a form oRotationplastyf partial amputation. For youngsters with tumours of the lower end of the thigh bone (distal femur) the advantage of a rotationplasty compared with an amputation is that it is in effect a modified below knee amputation.  The limb is shortened and the lower leg is rotated 180 degrees permitting the ankle to act as a new “knee” joint.  An artificial limb known as an exo-prosthesis has a special socket that fits onto the foot.  Rotationplasty has improved function over a trans-femoral amputation allowing patients to activity participate in sports.

Appearance is one of the biggest concerns of those considering rotationplasty.  Centres who offer this form of partial amputation frequently have patient advocates who have rotationplasties and can tell you what life is like living with a rotationplasty.  Unlike mid-thigh amputations rotationplasties are much more uncommon and not all centres have the appropriate skilled staff.  For example, the prosthetists, the specialists who fit exo-prostheses may or may not have experience fitting the socket to a foot. Good fitment of the exo-prosthesis is essential.

2. Rotationplasty vs JTS

Young patients who have tumours of the lower end of the thigh bone (distal femur) who are eligible for limb sparing may be offered an extendible implant or rotationplasty. Those who are very young, rotationplasty has the advantage of being only one major surgery.  Although implants are successful the amount of extension that can be obtained may not be sufficient to achieve legs of equal length at the time that growing ceases.  A partial or complete revision of the extendible implant may be required and this will involve further surgery.  Older patients who have less growing to do and who require a larger implant, may need only one implant.  Appearance is one of the biggest concerns of those considering rotationplasty compared to implant.  Implants have the advantage of retaining the natural appearance of the the leg and for many patients it does not limit their desired activities (although it is recommended that physical contact sports are not undertaken).

With the JTS non-invasive extending technology the length of your two legs came be maintained with periodic visits.  As a result of precision engineering the reliability of the extending mechanism is very good.  In addition, as the implants are made from titanium alloy, a very durable and strong material, the implant does not need replacing once skeletal maturity has been reached. Like extendible implants, rotationplasty is not issue-free and regular visits to the limb fitting centre will be needed, particularly within the first year when a number of legs and sockets will be required.  The length of the exo-prosthesis will also need to be adjusted to maintain the same leg length as the other leg grows. The fitting of a socket onto a foot is not commonplace and will require a prosthetist with experience of moulding this unusual socket.

3. Amputation vs JTS

There are occasions when amputation is the only surgical solution often due to the location of the tumor.  If limb sparing options are available your surgeon would advocate these rather than an amputation.  Extendible implants have the advantage that they keep the normal appearance of the limb, they are very reliable and many patients are not restricted in activities they wish to undertake.  Similarly, artificial limbs are not issue-free and the sockets require regular maintenance. The length also needs to be adjusted regularly.

Other Helpful Articles About Rotationplasty

If you are interesting in finding out more about Rotationplasty and limb sparing surgery please read the articles mentioned below:

Article: What is Rotationplasty

Article: What is Limb Sparing Surgery?

Watch our real life stories about the JTS implant

Copyright © 2017 | Stanmore Implants Ltd | Website by Varn Text Only Version