What are the Alternatives?

Limb Restoration AlternativesThere are a number of alternatives of limb restoration techniques available:

Implant – these are also known as massive implants, megaprostheses, tumor prostheses, and endoprostheses.  These specialist implants are made from a combination of two metals – Titanium alloy that is used for the implant body and the stem that fits into the bone, and Cobalt Chrome alloy which is very hard wearing and used for joints. Titanium alloy has been used for many years and it is the same metal as used in aircraft. It is very strong, very light, resists rusting (corrosion) and is biocompatible.  Implants are used to replace the long bones of the skeleton.  Each extendible implant is patient specific. Designers take the measurements from x-rays and design each implant to obtain the best fit – and very importantly to maximise the amount of extension that the implant can provide.

Allograft:  there are two types of allograft

– Osteoarticular allograft  –  a segment bone including the joint are obtained from a donor bone bank

– Intercalary allograft – a segment of bone from the mid region of a long bone is obtained from a donor bone bank.  This does not have a joint such as a knee or a hip attached.  The advantage is that the patient retains their own joints.

– Autograft: the patients fibula or fibulas can be taken out and replaced the defect

– Allograft prostheses composites – bone is obtained from a donor bone banks and used in conjunction with a metallic joint or massive replacement

– Irradiated bones (extracorporeal) – The cancerous bone can be taken out and sterilised. The bone is then replaced and secured back in place with metal plates and screws

Rotationplasty – if the cancer is in the lower end of the the thigh (femur), then this section can be removed along with some of the shin bone (tibia). The lower leg is turned 180 degrees and then the shin bone is attachment to the thigh bone.  The ankle points backwards and is used like a knee.

Amputation –  the surgical removal of the affected limb above the cancer.

Videos about JTS

Find our more about the JTS Implant by watching our video interviews with patients, surgeons and parents.

Watch a video about JTS

Real Life Stories

Watch our real life stories about the JTS implant

Surgeon Information

For information for your surgeon click here.
Watch our real life stories about the JTS implant
Copyright 2012 | Stanmore Implants Ltd | Design by Varn Media Privacy | Text Only Version

What are the Alternatives?

Limb Restoration AlternativesThere are a number of alternatives of limb restoration techniques available:

Implant – these are also known as massive implants, megaprostheses, tumor prostheses, and endoprostheses.  These specialist implants are made from a combination of two metals – Titanium alloy that is used for the implant body and the stem that fits into the bone, and Cobalt Chrome alloy which is very hard wearing and used for joints. Titanium alloy has been used for many years and it is the same metal as used in aircraft. It is very strong, very light, resists rusting (corrosion) and is biocompatible.  Implants are used to replace the long bones of the skeleton.  Each extendible implant is patient specific. Designers take the measurements from x-rays and design each implant to obtain the best fit – and very importantly to maximise the amount of extension that the implant can provide.

Allograft:  there are two types of allograft

– Osteoarticular allograft  –  a segment bone including the joint are obtained from a donor bone bank

– Intercalary allograft – a segment of bone from the mid region of a long bone is obtained from a donor bone bank.  This does not have a joint such as a knee or a hip attached.  The advantage is that the patient retains their own joints.

– Autograft: the patients fibula or fibulas can be taken out and replaced the defect

– Allograft prostheses composites – bone is obtained from a donor bone banks and used in conjunction with a metallic joint or massive replacement

– Irradiated bones (extracorporeal) – The cancerous bone can be taken out and sterilised. The bone is then replaced and secured back in place with metal plates and screws

Rotationplasty – if the cancer is in the lower end of the the thigh (femur), then this section can be removed along with some of the shin bone (tibia). The lower leg is turned 180 degrees and then the shin bone is attachment to the thigh bone.  The ankle points backwards and is used like a knee.

Amputation –  the surgical removal of the affected limb above the cancer.

Watch our real life stories about the JTS implant

Copyright © 2017 | Stanmore Implants Ltd | Website by Varn Text Only Version